Projects blog

RC car Landy 4×4 by 3DSets November 22 2019

Landy 4×4 Pickup by 3DSets is a 3D printable RC car inspired by the Land Rover 4×4 Pickup. This model is approx. 45 cm long (1:8 scale) and ready for your RC (Radio-Controlled) equipment. It has enough power to drive in terrain and is slow enough that the model is suitable for kids.

„Print, Build, Enjoy!“ is a 3DSets motto, this studio based in the Czech republic created this project in response to the ever-expanding hobby sector of 3D printing. A duo of designers Ondřej Slavík and Jiří Lorenčík spent about one year of their free time to develop their first RC car. They always dreamt of creating and offering something digital that would allow them to sell the product around the world while maintaining high quality. Now they have customers from every corner of the world. The first customer was from Mexico, the next one from Indonesia and Bali. Most customers, however, come from the Czech Republic, the USA, and Germany.

Landy 4x4 has all the fully-functional details based on a real car. Opening doors, hood, trunk, and other smaller features such as door handles, windshield wipers, side mirrors, including complete interior parts like floor mats! Even the body panels have gaps spaced like the actual car. 




“Don't buy parts - just print nearly all of them! You can print most of the pieces starting with bodywork, complete chassis, even Cardan joints, and gearbox. To complete the car, you can buy a motor, radio control electronics, tires, and dampers. Then you are ready for a ride.“ says Ondřej. Even repairs are easy. Just loose a few screws and exchange broken parts. And drive again, almost instantly!



„Many people enjoy the assembly process the most. That's why the assembly sequence is created in the way that they can continue assembling the model during the printing of other parts.“ Ondřej explains.

3DSets offers a complete package, including the 3D printable model and instructions on how most effectively print and build your car with references and links where to get non-printable parts and 3D printing materials to make the building as efficient as possible.


This is how you make your own Landy 4x4 in 4 steps:
1. Gather all the parts you need
a) The model with instructions by 3DSets
b) non-printable parts
c) 3D printing materials
2. Print
3. Build
4. Enjoy

Printed with:

Bodywork: 
PLA Extrafill „Turquoise Blue“
PLA Extrafill „Traffic White“

Chassis:
PLA Extrafill „Vertigo Grey“
PLA Extrafill „Traffic Black“

Lights and small accessories:
PLA Extrafill „Rapunzel Silver“
PLA Extrafill „Crystal Clear“

Interior:
PLA Extrafill „Chocolate Brown“

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3D Printed Violin by Bence Balogh November 08 2019

With a BSc degree in Mechatronics Engineering and a Master's degree in Economics, Bence Balogh found a new love for something unusual. As he participated in the Conference of Scientific Students' Associations in the subject of "Examination of 3D Printing Parameters on the products mechanical properties," he found an interesting topic by HovaLabs, an open-source project, the 3D printable acoustic violin.




"I used to learn how to play the piano and the classical guitar for many years, and I also tried playing the violin. Unfortunately, my violin career only lasted for about a month. I was fascinated by the grace of the violin, and I adore when someone is playing it professionally. It became a must to make one in order to test the connection between 3D printing and music," Ben explains.



"The original Hovalin was amazing, so I consulted with several musicians, especially prime violinists. They gave me useful tips about how to improve and develop the model. It became my obsession to create the violin as realistic as I could, based on the Hovalin and the recommendations by the professionals. I am really satisfied with the result so far. However, I am still working on details and collecting feedbacks for further improvements. The 3D printed violin is an instrument, ornament, and something spectacular," says Ben with excitement. 




In the beginning, Bence used basic PLA for the prototyping as it is the most common material that's also very easy to use. He had to make a few alternations regarding the bridge, as the strings were too strong and broke the original bridge made of PLA. He decided to use CPE for the neck and bridge because of the strain and holding capabilities. In the end, the body of the violin is constructed from PLA Crystal Clear "Smaragd Green", and the neck with the bridge is made from more rigid CPE HG100 "Iced Green Transparent". Full bodies took 40-50 hours to print on the Creality CR10S. Even with the lower resolution, it took 20-30 hours with few iterations. This project was very time-consuming. 




"Many of my friends who play the classical violin helped me, so I learned a lot about the soul, body, and the creation process of a violin. On the other hand, I deeply absorbed 3D printing, maintenance knowledge, 3D design, and remix skills. The most important was to have the patience for this project and the ability to learn from my mistakes. My main goal was to bring 3D printing, music, and people closer together and to challenge myself. Whenever I show the 3D printed violin to people, I see the pure joy and curiosity on their faces, and I think this is the real achievement," Ben tells us. With the help of Stella Nagy, he was able to take breathtaking pictures in The Palace of Music in Miskolc, Hungary.



Printed with:
Body: PLA Crystal "Clear Smaragd Green"
Neck, bridge: CPE HG100 "Iced Green Transparent"

Printed on: 
Creality CR10S

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Poly Disco Balls by Devin Montes October 11 2019

Devin Montes runs a YouTube channel and website called Make Anything with a belief that everybody should have access to well-designed products.

 

With the intent of building a single Polyhedra Disco Ball, Devin didn't hesitate to go big and printed around 1000 individual connecting parts called Polypanels. They come in any number of shapes, sizes, and forms, but the edge connectors are always the same so they are very compatible. Only two different models, the square and triangle panels, were used to make all these different shapes.

 

These Polyhedra panels are an example of the limitless possibilities that can be build just from a few simple building blocks. These particular panels were designed especially for holding pre-cut mirrors that were ordered online. PLA Vertigo Starlight was the perfect complement to the mirrors, giving that extra pop of contrast Devin was hoping for.

 

Download here:
Myminifactory

Printed with:
PLA Extrafill "Vertigo Starlight"

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Ragnaros Lamp Figure by 3Dmon October 04 2019

For several years the 3Dmon team has been working in the 3D printing and 3D modeling industry. They consist of passionate 3D printers and 3D modelers based in Prague. Fantasy and cosplay being their long-time hobby they created this cool Ragnaros Lamp Figure from World of Warcraft.

3D printed fan art figures are pretty fun, but if you want to step up your game, the combination of 3D printed parts and electronics like LED’s is your way to go. 3Demon created this figure, presenting unique challenges while being pretty simple and straight forward to make. For everyone who wants to make their collection just a bit more unique Ragnaros the Fire lord is a perfect pick.


You can either pick to print your own model or order a physical one.
Read more about this project on Instructables or watch a tutorial video.

Printed with:
PLA Crystal Clear
PLA Extrafill "Vertigo Galaxy"

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3D printed sole by Lucie Trejtnarová September 27 2019

Lucie Trejtnarová, a student of the Footwear design studio, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Czech Republic, has developed the Organic 3D printed shoe collection.

"Designers of the new generation are starting to think differently with the developing of new materials and using waste and natural resources to reuse what already exists. This fact inspired me for my project," explains Lucie. 

The experimental collection of shoes is the outcome of the Diploma thesis called Organic mentored by Ivana Kaňovská and Eva Klabalová. Trejtnarová researched recently introduced ecologically friendly materials developed by designers of a new generation. Her work aims to assess the suitability of these materials for the processes of footwear and accessories manufacturing.
At the heart of the work, there is a revolution material Malai - also known as coconut leather, which is fully compostable. This material is used in combination with ecological-friendly material Piňatex – a natural fabric made from pineapple leaves. To support natural fabrics, the designer wanted to find suitable materials for soles. Thanks to cooperation with Fillamentum company from a previous school project, Trejtnarová discovered Flexfill 98A and Flexfill 92A.

The experimental sandal line integrates 3D printed outsoles from TPU-based Flexfill 98A, which could be recyclable.


The entire process of work and research is backed up by her experience from an internship in India, the production place of this material. With these materials, Trejtnarová chose to create sandals to suit the warm and wet conditions of India.


Printed by:
Ondřej Puchta, Miloš Cettl, Lucie Trejtnarová, Fillamentum Ltd.

Design:
Lucie Trejtnarová

Printed with:
Flexfill TPU 98A "Powder Beige"

Printed on: 
Ultimaker S3, TRILAB DeltiQ 

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