Projects blog

Poly Disco Balls by Devin Montes October 11 2019

Devin Montes runs a YouTube channel and website called Make Anything with a belief that everybody should have access to well-designed products.

 

With the intent of building a single Polyhedra Disco Ball, Devin didn't hesitate to go big and printed around 1000 individual connecting parts called Polypanels. They come in any number of shapes, sizes, and forms, but the edge connectors are always the same so they are very compatible. Only two different models, the square and triangle panels, were used to make all these different shapes.

 

These Polyhedra panels are an example of the limitless possibilities that can be build just from a few simple building blocks. These particular panels were designed especially for holding pre-cut mirrors that were ordered online. PLA Vertigo Starlight was the perfect complement to the mirrors, giving that extra pop of contrast Devin was hoping for.

 

Download here:
Myminifactory

Printed with:
PLA Extrafill "Vertigo Starlight"

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Ragnaros Lamp Figure by 3Dmon October 04 2019

For several years the 3Dmon team has been working in the 3D printing and 3D modeling industry. They consist of passionate 3D printers and 3D modelers based in Prague. Fantasy and cosplay being their long-time hobby they created this cool Ragnaros Lamp Figure from World of Warcraft.

3D printed fan art figures are pretty fun, but if you want to step up your game, the combination of 3D printed parts and electronics like LED’s is your way to go. 3Demon created this figure, presenting unique challenges while being pretty simple and straight forward to make. For everyone who wants to make their collection just a bit more unique Ragnaros the Fire lord is a perfect pick.


You can either pick to print your own model or order a physical one.
Read more about this project on Instructables or watch a tutorial video.

Printed with:
PLA Crystal Clear
PLA Extrafill "Vertigo Galaxy"

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3D printed sole for sandals by Lucie Trejtnarová September 27 2019

Lucie Trejtnarová, a student of the Footwear design studio, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Czech Republic, has developed the Organic 3D printed shoe collection.

"Designers of the new generation are starting to think differently with the developing of new materials and using waste and natural resources to reuse what already exists. This fact inspired me for my project," explains Lucie. 

The experimental collection of shoes is the outcome of the Diploma thesis called Organic mentored by Ivana Kaňovská and Eva Klabalová. Trejtnarová researched recently introduced ecologically friendly materials developed by designers of a new generation. Her work aims to assess the suitability of these materials for the processes of footwear and accessories manufacturing.
At the heart of the work, there is a revolution material Malai - also known as coconut leather, which is fully compostable. This material is used in combination with ecological-friendly material Piňatex – a natural fabric made from pineapple leaves. To support natural fabrics, the designer wanted to find suitable materials for soles. Thanks to cooperation with Fillamentum company from a previous school project, Trejtnarová discovered Flexfill 98A and Flexfill 92A.

The experimental sandal line integrates 3D printed outsoles from TPU-based Flexfill 98A, which could be recyclable.

 


The entire process of work and research is backed up by her experience from an internship in India, the production place of this material. With these materials, Trejtnarová chose to create sandals to suit the warm and wet conditions of India.


Printed by:
Ondřej Puchta, Miloš Cettl, Lucie Trejtnarová, Fillamentum Ltd.

Design:
Lucie Trejtnarová

Printed with:
Flexfill TPU 98A "Powder Beige"

Printed on: 
Ultimaker S3, TRILAB DeltiQ 

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Kordran Conflict, 3D printed strategy game June 27 2019

What was the last time you played some tabletop games? If you are a daily player or you just spent a few seconds trying to remember, here is an interesting project from Plastic Alchemy. Four game lovers get their ideas together and soon we will be able to play complex 3D printed tabletop game, which is called Kordran Conflict.

It’s common to print figures and small accessories for tabletop games. But you have something more complex, please, tell us about your project.
In the last few years games have become a big reason people are getting into 3D printing. There is a bubbling community of people making miniatures and terrain for tabletop games, I think this is just the beginning. Digital distribution, DLC, photogrammetry and other opportunities exist to truly innovate games that can take advantage of the flexibility of 3D printing and it’s customisability. Just one example, imagine a detective game set in a model of your own house, with custom avatars of each player? Only now can this kind of thing happen with 3D printing.

Our team - Fotis Mint, Clockspring and Reddadsteve, all incredible designers in their own right, have joined us at Plastic Alchemy to create games that are easy to print and beautifully designed, while myself and co-designer Evan, with a growing group of playtesters are designing original games to download, print and play.

So this is just the beginning?: )
Yes, we hope so. The first thing was to make a great game, hence our first release, Kordran Conflict.

What kind of game is Kordran Conflict?
For me, the most exciting 3D printable designs are original, so from the ground up we wanted to make a game based in our own sci-fi world. Set on a distant planet with multiple nations, Kordran Conflict is a skirmish strategy game for two players. Each battle miniatures on a large hexagon grid we call the ‘Battle map’. We wanted something that was quick to play but didn’t compromise on depth and complexity either. One battle can take around 15 minutes and can be played in isolation, or players can choose to play a longer campaign that incorporates grand strategy elements, using unique modular world tiles.

How many objects do we need to print to start to play?
For all the positives in 3D printing, the time cost of making all this stuff can be an issue. We set out to reduce this by giving people a way to play the game and print more of it as they go along. By creating a ‘Hybrid’ starter set we’ve removed the need to print all 127 hexagon tiles in the game by replacing them with a board. Players can focus on printing the ‘cool’ stuff like the 18 miniatures per player, barriers and tokens. Inside the box will also be cards for each unit, rulebook, dice and a few extras to help you get playing quickly.

Btw. you can print those figures bigger and have some nice “merchandise” : ) (is it allowed?)
Funny you say that, we actually have a full size model designed by Steve that is all multi-assembly. If it’s popular, I’m sure we’d make more.

How many different materials/colours do we need to have the game in full set?
Obviously, everyone is free to print and customise the game as they see fit, however we recommend 2 colours for the units and a neutral colour for the tiles/barriers. 

Where can models be found , or how this is all working?
Kickstarter always looked like the best platform to launch this kind of project so we’re planning to release the full game there in September. In the lead up to the release we’re having a great time building a community who are printing free stls and downloading playtest kits from our website -  www.kordranconflict.com

Why did you choose Fillamentum as a recommended brand for your game?
Making models that look great and are easy to print is really, really important. 
Our models have built-in supports and have been designed for many brands of 3D printer, but we to guarantee those results we needed a reliable filament. Extrafill has offered us two things:
Consistent, durable filament that sticks to the bed and performs at a range of temperatures.
Beautiful range of colours that allow our work to flourish from concept, design to finished minis.

Aaaand the last one - why should we  play Kordran Conflict? : )
We’re massive gamers ourselves and drew influence from many places when designing Kordran Conflict. Our game has been compared to Heroscape, Xcom, Magic the Gathering and Infinity, all amazing games which we are delighted to be compared to. We’ve worked very hard to make something that is easy to print & to play, a game that will grow overtime, is affordable and customisable. In the next year, we’d like to continue releasing games for the same tile system, making a collection that will be fun to build and play for years!

 

Josh (Plastic Alchemy) & Laila (Fillamentum)

 

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