Projects blog

Espana figure by Arte Creator January 17 2020

Arte Creator is a duo of two amazing artists who are also a couple, Gonçalo and Barbara. They both design and print their figures. Although each of them has their own projects and work, 3D printing is what they both do in their free time.


(Printed by Leonardo Delgado with PLA Extrafill Pearl Ruby Red, Gold Happens, Mukha, Chocolate Brown)

The reason behind designing and 3D printing the figures they are known for is giving a physical form to their designs. "Every time we print a digital design for the first time is always an amazing feeling. Our latest model Espana was created using the sensual Spanish Flamenco dancers as a reference, with a loose approach," they explain. At the same time, Espana was also inspired by traditional dolls, which is something that is not often seen in the 3D printing community.


(Printed by Filament Frenzy with PLA Extrafill Wizard's Voodoo and Gold Happens)

All learning process takes time and so with the question 'Would you change anything if given a chance?' Arte creator answered deliberately.
"In truth, no, all was where it should have been. We had to take the time to learn and to make every aspect of her as perfect as possible. She is unique because, at every step, there was a desire to improve," Arte Creator replied. 




However, creating a complex model like this came with many challenges. "She was created in Zbrush. During the modeling, we learned more techniques and features in the software — lots of Live Boolean use and Folder features. We also needed to learn how to prepare the parts for multi-material printing," they added. You can find all the files for this model on Myminifactory.


(Left print by Filament Frenzy, Right print by Leonardo Delgado)

She was also created with a clear desire to allow for painting. However, painting skills are something that not everyone has learned. That's why they decided to design the model for multi-color printing — using systems like Mosaic Manufacturing Palette. "It took a lot of work, but it was worth it, the result was something unique. People still today look at the multi-colored prints of her and think they are painted," they say



Making the models easy to replicate is another essential quality aspect that Arte Creators sets as their brand goal. All the figures, including Espana, are made to be easy to print, with almost no supports, and easy to assemble without glue.

"In the end, the results were better than we expected. Not only the multi-material prints we have been seeing of her are gorgeous; each one looks like a different character. Each maker chooses its own set of colors defining its own version. We have also seen painted versions that have made our jaws drop,"
they say in excitement. 


(Printed and painted by Grafit)

Choosing the right material plays a significant role in creating a stable product with only the highest quality. "We chose Fillamentum because your filaments are reliable. At one point, we had to rush and print Espana quickly to send her to someone. Thinking that we will be faster, we bought filament that was more at hand only to have the printed parts with inconsistent, evident layers. We had then rushed to repurchase Fillamentum material at the expense of time because we knew we could depend on it. Prints were perfect after that. Moral of the story, beware shortcuts, you might end up spending more time." Arte Creator says. 

Model:
Myminifactory

Printed with:
PLA Extrafill Pearl Ruby Red
PLA Extrafill Wizard's Voodoo
PLA Extrafill Gold Happens
PLA Extrafill Chocolate Brown
PLA Extrafill Mukha

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3D printed Lamp series by UUP Design November 15 2019

Triin Kõivupuu & Andre Visnapuu are the founders of UUP Design, a design studio based in Estonia. Both of them studied at Pallas University of Applied Sciences, where they met. Soon they discovered that they share the same passion and ideas in design.



In the beginning, they brought their first 3D printer solely for prototyping purposes. However, as they discovered the capabilities of 3D printing, they soon fell in love with the final finish of the printed objects. Especially the Timebrfills natural finish fresh from the printer.

"At first, we didn't plan to build our series on 3D printing, but then we started to print with Timebrfill…" they explain.



When they started to print, PLA was their clear beginning choice because it is effortless to set up and print. Furthermore, the environmental aspect is also vital to Triin and Andre.

"By working with different materials, we are seeking special and economical solutions, designing future classics. We love what we do and hope it reflects in our products," said UPP Design.



PLA Extrafill and Timberfill are 100% bio-based and biodegradable materials. However, an industrial composting facility, where large piles are used, and aeration & moisture are appropriately controlled, is needed. Biodegradable plastics can be collected and composted through biowaste collection.

They created two collections, namely KUMA, the floor lamp & HÕÕG lighting series, with a ceiling lamp and a table lamp.



KUMA
Andre and Triin used PLA Extrafill that, when printed, exhibits pleasant texture. Ultimately the lamp gives out a cozy textilelike felling rather than the look of bleak plastic. White lampshade provides enough light for reading; it gives out a delightful mood light. The lamp is also made of elements such as textile cable, metal pipes, and metal socket, creating a charming ceiling lamp. It took about a year of testing and tweaking the product to finalize the design.



HÕÕG lighting series

UUP Design used Timberfill, which is a wood composite material with real wood fibers. The wood fibers display an authentic natural look and wood sensation. "Hõõg table lamp has a lightweight, and yet stable lamp rosette creating a lampshade which is 3D printed. Lampshades are minimal in design and inspired by the classic form," adds Andre. The dome design is created to conceal the light bulb, resulting in a clean appearance with mood hazy light.



"We couldn't be happier with this environmentally friendly material selection; all printed details are made with biodegradable plastic," Triin and UUP Design say in excitement. An important note is that this product has been designed, produced, and even packed in an environmentally friendly manner from the beginning to the end.



Printed with:

PLA Extrafill "Traffic White"
Timberfill "Light Wood Tone"
Timberfill "Cinnamon"

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3D Printed Violin by Bence Balogh November 08 2019

With a BSc degree in Mechatronics Engineering and a Master's degree in Economics, Bence Balogh found a new love for something unusual. As he participated in the Conference of Scientific Students' Associations in the subject of "Examination of 3D Printing Parameters on the products mechanical properties," he found an interesting topic by HovaLabs, an open-source project, the 3D printable acoustic violin.




"I used to learn how to play the piano and the classical guitar for many years, and I also tried playing the violin. Unfortunately, my violin career only lasted for about a month. I was fascinated by the grace of the violin, and I adore when someone is playing it professionally. It became a must to make one in order to test the connection between 3D printing and music," Ben explains.



"The original Hovalin was amazing, so I consulted with several musicians, especially prime violinists. They gave me useful tips about how to improve and develop the model. It became my obsession to create the violin as realistic as I could, based on the Hovalin and the recommendations by the professionals. I am really satisfied with the result so far. However, I am still working on details and collecting feedbacks for further improvements. The 3D printed violin is an instrument, ornament, and something spectacular," says Ben with excitement. 




In the beginning, Bence used basic PLA for the prototyping as it is the most common material that's also very easy to use. He had to make a few alternations regarding the bridge, as the strings were too strong and broke the original bridge made of PLA. He decided to use CPE for the neck and bridge because of the strain and holding capabilities. In the end, the body of the violin is constructed from PLA Crystal Clear "Smaragd Green", and the neck with the bridge is made from more rigid CPE HG100 "Iced Green Transparent". Full bodies took 40-50 hours to print on the Creality CR10S. Even with the lower resolution, it took 20-30 hours with few iterations. This project was very time-consuming. 




"Many of my friends who play the classical violin helped me, so I learned a lot about the soul, body, and the creation process of a violin. On the other hand, I deeply absorbed 3D printing, maintenance knowledge, 3D design, and remix skills. The most important was to have the patience for this project and the ability to learn from my mistakes. My main goal was to bring 3D printing, music, and people closer together and to challenge myself. Whenever I show the 3D printed violin to people, I see the pure joy and curiosity on their faces, and I think this is the real achievement," Ben tells us. With the help of Stella Nagy, he was able to take breathtaking pictures in The Palace of Music in Miskolc, Hungary.



Printed with:
Body: PLA Crystal "Clear Smaragd Green"
Neck, bridge: CPE HG100 "Iced Green Transparent"

Printed on: 
Creality CR10S

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