Projects blog

Generative Coral in Palette random mode March 06 2020

If you love printing figures and other decorative objects, you will love this Generative Coral designed by Fernando Jerez. Sometimes it can get dull printing with just one color. With Palette 2 PRO  random mode, you can create an original motive that will stand out in your house. 



The generative design by Fernando looks just awesome with the random color combination. PLA Luminous GreenLuminous Yellow, Everybody's MagentaTraffic White create an eyecatching pattern. Working with Pallete 2 PRO is fairly straightforward. All you need to do is choose your favorite colors and model, and you are good to go.

Model by Fernando Jerez: 
Myminifactory

Printed on:
Palette 2 PRO

Printed with:
PLA Extrafill "Luminous Green"
PLA Extrafill "Luminous Yellow"
PLA Extrafill "Everybody's Magenta"
PLA Extrafill "Traffic White"

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Food Print Exibition February 28 2020

The title combines the words FOOD, as in nourishment, and PRINT, which is linked to the latest 3D printers. A subtle change in pronunciation from a voiced to unvoiced consonant unfolds the second meaning of this exhibition, a "footprint" as the impact of human activities on earth.

The main message of the exhibition is to reflect on the processes connected with food production. Mainly as consumers, our mostly unconscious choices have consequences for which we need to be responsible. This is an opportunity to be involved in these topics not only as active participants but also as company leaders that can manage the movements towards the sustainability of the whole system.

The FoodPrint Exhibition is open since the 4th of March until the 22nd of April 2020 at Satelit Galery, Bratislava (Slovak Republic).

All prints are concepts of design. Before applying them into real using it's necessary to choose materials suitable for the asked use case.

 
Clean & Green by Dominika Špániková UTB ADE 



Creating a sustainable ideal shape for growing plants without soil was the main objective in the creation of this 3D printed container. You can use it with any glass or jar containing a nutrient solution. Thanks to the simple shape Clean & Green can be used by a wide variety of people from beginners through the researchers to professionals anywhere around the globe. 

This plant container was printed with PLA Extrafill "Traffic Black" on Trilab DeltiQ by the Product Design department at Tomas Bata University. 

 

Instant Garden by Tomáš Palou UTB ADE

This well thought design functions as a self-watering planter that can be hung in any sunny spot. The rope on which you can hang the planter functions also as a watering wick cord and the water reservoir is detachable. This way the herbs are watered by gravity while redundant water is kept in the reservoir tank. There are also peat pellets and herb seeds inside the containers which will make planting your convenient garden so much easier.

The planter was printed with PLA Extrafill "Light Ivory" on Trilab DeltiQ by the Product Design department at Tomas Bata University.

 

Herb Attachment by Ninjee Orchibat UTB ADE



The concept of this handy tool was to prolong the shelf life of fresh herbs in a fridge. The attachment is put into standard kitchen jars with water. The practical design uses hydroponics principles. The 3D printed parts can be taken apart to make the manipulation and maintenance easier. As the product is a 3D printed object the model can be easily changed to fit other containers.

Printed with PLA Extrafill "Traffic White""Traffic Black" on Trilab DeltiQ by the Product Design department at Tomas Bata University. 

 

Cookie cutters Cut Out by Adriána Lišková and Barbora Semanová UTB ADE



Bake creatively without limits! These cookie cutters are a handy tool in your baking repertoire. They are inspired by the original Slovak folk embroidery and colors. The three shapes offer a wide range of different patterns that can be created. Thanks to a practical space-saving stackable design you can comfortably store them anywhere. 

The Cookie cutters were printed with PLA Extrafill "Noble Blue" and "Traffic Red" on Trilab DeltiQ by the Product Design department at Tomas Bata University.

 

Badges with the opinion by Simona Frková UTB ADE



To reflect on pressing world issues, Simona Frková has decided to create a wearable statement that creatively points to serious topics in our society. Among topics that the badges depict are plastics in oceans, waste, importing of local food from abroad, battery farming practices, genetic modifications, or aesthetically imperfect vegetables. By wearing these badges, you can express disagreement with these issues, building awareness. The author added little more individuality to the pins by painting the details of each pin by hand. 

The Badges were printed with PLA Extrafill "Noble Blue", "Traffic Red", "Traffic White" & "Metallic Grey"  on Trilab DeltiQ by the Product Design department at Tomas Bata University.

 

Choco by Kateřina Kochánková UTB ADE



This double-sided chocolate mold was created by combining basic shapes to create a continuous motive. The idea is based on combinatorics. It's a simple way to create a unique variable design. The chocolate is fairly easy to tip off the after it solidifies.

The Choco mold was printed with PLA Extrafill "Luminous Green", "Turquoise Blue" and Crystal Clear, on Trilab DeltiQ by the Product Design Department at Tomas Bata University

 

AVO - growing system by Karolína Krajčoviechová UTB ADE



This handy tool enables a comfortable hydroponic rooting of a seed into water. It consists of two parts that can be disassembled for easy cleaning and storing. The first part is made of a flexible filament Flexfill TPU 98A "Metallic Grey". Thanks to the flexibility of this part, it can fit any glass easily. The second part is solid printed with PLA Extrafill "Traffic Black" and holds the cleaned seed or a pit with three spikes gently submerged in the water. The water can be changed easily every other day until the first root and sprout appear.

The growing system was printed on Trilab DeltiQ by the Product Design Department at Tomas Bata University.  

 

Coffee Spoon by Simona Kopecká UTB ADE



The idea behind this design is to eliminate multiple disposable packagings into one. This standard Birchwood Coffee Stirrer was upgraded with additional water-soluble agents for coffee that would be usually packaged separately. Thanks to 3D printing, it was relatively simple to fabricate a mold for the coffee additives with the birchwood stirrer. This way, instead of a plastic stirrer, a sugar stick, and creamer, you'll get all in one. 

It was printed with PLA Extrafill "Traffic Black" & "Metallic Grey" on Trilab DeltiQ by the Digital Design department at Tomas Bata University. 


The project, initiated by the Faculty of Multimedia Communications TBU in Zlin (CZ), is in a partnership with the Department of Furniture and Interior Design TU Zvolen (SK), Taipei Tech (TW), Universidade do Algarve (PT).


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Espana figure by Arte Creator January 17 2020

Arte Creator is a duo of two amazing artists who are also a couple, Gonçalo and Barbara. They both design and print their figures. Although each of them has their own projects and work, 3D printing is what they both do in their free time.


(Printed by Leonardo Delgado with PLA Extrafill Pearl Ruby Red, Gold Happens, Mukha, Chocolate Brown)

The reason behind designing and 3D printing the figures they are known for is giving a physical form to their designs. "Every time we print a digital design for the first time is always an amazing feeling. Our latest model Espana was created using the sensual Spanish Flamenco dancers as a reference, with a loose approach," they explain. At the same time, Espana was also inspired by traditional dolls, which is something that is not often seen in the 3D printing community.


(Printed by Filament Frenzy with PLA Extrafill Wizard's Voodoo and Gold Happens)

All learning process takes time and so with the question 'Would you change anything if given a chance?' Arte creator answered deliberately.
"In truth, no, all was where it should have been. We had to take the time to learn and to make every aspect of her as perfect as possible. She is unique because, at every step, there was a desire to improve," Arte Creator replied. 




However, creating a complex model like this came with many challenges. "She was created in Zbrush. During the modeling, we learned more techniques and features in the software — lots of Live Boolean use and Folder features. We also needed to learn how to prepare the parts for multi-material printing," they added. You can find all the files for this model on Myminifactory.


(Left print by Filament Frenzy, Right print by Leonardo Delgado)

She was also created with a clear desire to allow for painting. However, painting skills are something that not everyone has learned. That's why they decided to design the model for multi-color printing — using systems like Mosaic Manufacturing Palette. "It took a lot of work, but it was worth it, the result was something unique. People still today look at the multi-colored prints of her and think they are painted," they say



Making the models easy to replicate is another essential quality aspect that Arte Creators sets as their brand goal. All the figures, including Espana, are made to be easy to print, with almost no supports, and easy to assemble without glue.

"In the end, the results were better than we expected. Not only the multi-material prints we have been seeing of her are gorgeous; each one looks like a different character. Each maker chooses its own set of colors defining its own version. We have also seen painted versions that have made our jaws drop,"
they say in excitement. 


(Printed and painted by Grafit)

Choosing the right material plays a significant role in creating a stable product with only the highest quality. "We chose Fillamentum because your filaments are reliable. At one point, we had to rush and print Espana quickly to send her to someone. Thinking that we will be faster, we bought filament that was more at hand only to have the printed parts with inconsistent, evident layers. We had then rushed to repurchase Fillamentum material at the expense of time because we knew we could depend on it. Prints were perfect after that. Moral of the story, beware shortcuts, you might end up spending more time." Arte Creator says. 

Model:
Myminifactory

Printed with:
PLA Extrafill Pearl Ruby Red
PLA Extrafill Wizard's Voodoo
PLA Extrafill Gold Happens
PLA Extrafill Chocolate Brown
PLA Extrafill Mukha

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3D printed Lamp series by UUP Design November 15 2019

Triin Kõivupuu & Andre Visnapuu are the founders of UUP Design, a design studio based in Estonia. Both of them studied at Pallas University of Applied Sciences, where they met. Soon they discovered that they share the same passion and ideas in design.



In the beginning, they brought their first 3D printer solely for prototyping purposes. However, as they discovered the capabilities of 3D printing, they soon fell in love with the final finish of the printed objects. Especially the Timebrfills natural finish fresh from the printer.

"At first, we didn't plan to build our series on 3D printing, but then we started to print with Timebrfill…" they explain.



When they started to print, PLA was their clear beginning choice because it is effortless to set up and print. Furthermore, the environmental aspect is also vital to Triin and Andre.

"By working with different materials, we are seeking special and economical solutions, designing future classics. We love what we do and hope it reflects in our products," said UPP Design.



PLA Extrafill and Timberfill are 100% bio-based and biodegradable materials. However, an industrial composting facility, where large piles are used, and aeration & moisture are appropriately controlled, is needed. Biodegradable plastics can be collected and composted through biowaste collection.

They created two collections, namely KUMA, the floor lamp & HÕÕG lighting series, with a ceiling lamp and a table lamp.



KUMA
Andre and Triin used PLA Extrafill that, when printed, exhibits pleasant texture. Ultimately the lamp gives out a cozy textilelike felling rather than the look of bleak plastic. White lampshade provides enough light for reading; it gives out a delightful mood light. The lamp is also made of elements such as textile cable, metal pipes, and metal socket, creating a charming ceiling lamp. It took about a year of testing and tweaking the product to finalize the design.



HÕÕG lighting series

UUP Design used Timberfill, which is a wood composite material with real wood fibers. The wood fibers display an authentic natural look and wood sensation. "Hõõg table lamp has a lightweight, and yet stable lamp rosette creating a lampshade which is 3D printed. Lampshades are minimal in design and inspired by the classic form," adds Andre. The dome design is created to conceal the light bulb, resulting in a clean appearance with mood hazy light.



"We couldn't be happier with this environmentally friendly material selection; all printed details are made with biodegradable plastic," Triin and UUP Design say in excitement. An important note is that this product has been designed, produced, and even packed in an environmentally friendly manner from the beginning to the end.



Printed with:

PLA Extrafill "Traffic White"
Timberfill "Light Wood Tone"
Timberfill "Cinnamon"

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3D Printed Violin by Bence Balogh November 08 2019

With a BSc degree in Mechatronics Engineering and a Master's degree in Economics, Bence Balogh found a new love for something unusual. As he participated in the Conference of Scientific Students' Associations in the subject of "Examination of 3D Printing Parameters on the products mechanical properties," he found an interesting topic by HovaLabs, an open-source project, the 3D printable acoustic violin.




"I used to learn how to play the piano and the classical guitar for many years, and I also tried playing the violin. Unfortunately, my violin career only lasted for about a month. I was fascinated by the grace of the violin, and I adore when someone is playing it professionally. It became a must to make one in order to test the connection between 3D printing and music," Ben explains.



"The original Hovalin was amazing, so I consulted with several musicians, especially prime violinists. They gave me useful tips about how to improve and develop the model. It became my obsession to create the violin as realistic as I could, based on the Hovalin and the recommendations by the professionals. I am really satisfied with the result so far. However, I am still working on details and collecting feedbacks for further improvements. The 3D printed violin is an instrument, ornament, and something spectacular," says Ben with excitement. 




In the beginning, Bence used basic PLA for the prototyping as it is the most common material that's also very easy to use. He had to make a few alternations regarding the bridge, as the strings were too strong and broke the original bridge made of PLA. He decided to use CPE for the neck and bridge because of the strain and holding capabilities. In the end, the body of the violin is constructed from PLA Crystal Clear "Smaragd Green", and the neck with the bridge is made from more rigid CPE HG100 "Iced Green Transparent". Full bodies took 40-50 hours to print on the Creality CR10S. Even with the lower resolution, it took 20-30 hours with few iterations. This project was very time-consuming. 




"Many of my friends who play the classical violin helped me, so I learned a lot about the soul, body, and the creation process of a violin. On the other hand, I deeply absorbed 3D printing, maintenance knowledge, 3D design, and remix skills. The most important was to have the patience for this project and the ability to learn from my mistakes. My main goal was to bring 3D printing, music, and people closer together and to challenge myself. Whenever I show the 3D printed violin to people, I see the pure joy and curiosity on their faces, and I think this is the real achievement," Ben tells us. With the help of Stella Nagy, he was able to take breathtaking pictures in The Palace of Music in Miskolc, Hungary.



Printed with:
Body: PLA Crystal "Clear Smaragd Green"
Neck, bridge: CPE HG100 "Iced Green Transparent"

Printed on: 
Creality CR10S

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Poly Disco Balls by Devin Montes October 11 2019

Devin Montes runs a YouTube channel and website called Make Anything with a belief that everybody should have access to well-designed products.

 

With the intent of building a single Polyhedra Disco Ball, Devin didn't hesitate to go big and printed around 1000 individual connecting parts called Polypanels. They come in any number of shapes, sizes, and forms, but the edge connectors are always the same so they are very compatible. Only two different models, the square and triangle panels, were used to make all these different shapes.

 

These Polyhedra panels are an example of the limitless possibilities that can be build just from a few simple building blocks. These particular panels were designed especially for holding pre-cut mirrors that were ordered online. PLA Vertigo Starlight was the perfect complement to the mirrors, giving that extra pop of contrast Devin was hoping for.

 

Download here:
Myminifactory

Printed with:
PLA Extrafill "Vertigo Starlight"

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Design process of the silicone cover for Trezor T2 by PROTOTYPUM August 05 2019

PROTOTYPUM is a Czech design and innovation studio focused on industrial design, prototyping and engineering founded in 2015 in Prague.

Trezor is a hardware wallet for cryptocurrencies (so-called cold storage) but it can be also used for secondary authentification to your email or as a password manager.


PROTOTYPUM team worked on the project from the first sketch and continued through CAD modeling, prototyping by 3D printing, prototyping in silicone and finally, preparations for the final serial production. During the first stage of prototyping, a lot of 3D printed prototypes from the Fillamentum's Flexfill 92A has been printed (over a hundred pieces). This flexible material helped them to test the features of the design before prototyping it from silicone. Fillamentum's Flexfill 92A material actually helped them to develop the product much faster and also cheaper.

 

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VooDoo Bree by Arte Creator July 01 2019

Did you know that Arte Creator is not one designer but a fantastic duo: Barbara & Goncalo? Now you do, and let’s talk to them about their latest design - Voodoo Bree!

Followers on our social networks may already know you for your epic designs of Bree and Summer - the skater girl. Now you’ve prepared something brand new, inspired by our Voodoo
The idea came when you guys posted some photos of the original Bree printed with voodoo filament by some makers. You guys called her Voodoo Bree at the time. We loved the name and answered back playing with the idea that even better was to make a version of her matching the name. Something like Tia Dalma from the Pirates of the Caribbean movies. That idea never got out of our minds, so of course, we had to make her!

We think she looks fantastic in every colour, but sure, the prints from Tore Langelandsvik and Tom Jackson were fabulous! Where can we find the stl?
Indeed they were amazing prints that add value to the model! The STL can be found at MyMiniFactory LINK.

We were writing with you during the designing process and found it interesting to talk about it. How many iterations did you print until you got to the final shape?
Our previous models: Summer and Bree gave us a lot of experience through several experiences and iterations. They paid off with smoother production flow with this new character. As then, we’d already known what works and what doesn't. The printing went well at the first try: with her cap, head, body, featuring many details and she’s support-free. Only the base (or stand) was more labour-intensive the leaves where something new to us. As for the 3D model, there where a few iterations like the angle of the head, the hair, different cloth details, the base size and the amount of branches and leaves in it.

Which head angle didn't work out? As a designer, how do you see the need to change design because of printing?
Some angles don't work out because they can actually change the personality or intention of the character; a head bending over the doll would look intimidating if not awkward. If she were tilted to the right, it would break the flow and the body line. So we opted for this angle as it’s more like a “haaaw, you are a cute doll!! The things I'm going to do to you!!”
Her pose, similar to the original Bree, is intended to help achieve our model without supports, as the printer will always go at a printable angle. It starts going from the base to the hips, where the hands and arms are in an angle that the machine can handle without overhangs, and from there to the neck. The head was made separately as there was no way to make it without support, and it is cut flatten same as the cap so they can be printed flat on the printer bed.

There were some issues with the leaves stand… 
The problem with the leaves where the thickness and level of detail. When printing, you would have a lot of small “islands”, this makes the nozzle move like crazy from one point to another leading to some failed prints. That’s the reason why we have to test before releasing the models to the community. This can be tweaked and solved with better cooling and multiple-layered profile printing, but not everyone has, can or want that, and we don't want to impose it. So we tried to simplify the leaves’ shape, merge them a bit to make them easier to print. Overhangs and printing angles are other things that designers must take into account if they want the model to be as easy to print as possible. These are the models made by makers for makers. We first make sure the model is easy for us to print. If it works for us, it will work for everyone else if we don't push for the printers. If it fails, it will also for other people, and that's not an option, so we’re back at the drawing board!

Zbrush for modeling, our PLA for printing. Btw. what printer do you use?
Indeed, those are our tools! We use mainly our Creality CR10S, but we also have a Creality Ender 3, a Peopoly Moai, and recently acquired the Anycubic Photon.

Why did you choose our materials to work with?
We have tried other materials before but a friend advised us to try your brand, and so we did, and we love printing with them since then. They work well in our printers, and the results speak for themselves as everyone can see from the photos we have published.


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Mechdonalds Printed by Grafit February 27 2019

He is from Hungary and we met on Twitter while he was using our materials for really nice and clean printing. “I am already helping Fernando with his top secret project, beta testing at 40% size”. We knew we are on the same page to make some good collaboration!

*Fernando Jerez is our long-time friend, he’s talented designer who started the wavey madness with his generative design.

Hello Grafit,
When I was asking you about some ideas for a new bigger project, you wanted to print exactly this amazing design by Juri Pranjic. How did you find the model?
I have seen this earlier on Twitter when Juri designed it and started printing his own. I became a follower of @3dworkbench instantly.

Two materials in seven different colours, tell us more about the printing process ... Which printer you used, how long did it take to print? Did you use any tricks or special set up for printing?
Well, the CPE Red Hood filament was a completely new material for me. And because it needed high temperature, I used my Prusa i3 MK3 for that job. No failures there. It came out nicely in the first round. On the pictures you can see, it is the tomato slice.
Since I scaled up this awesome model to 140% I had to use some tricks. For example, on the original model, every part of the burger is solid. However in a perfect world, you will never see the inside of the tomato slice, and the meat etc. so I decided to cut out most parts. The tomato slice is a ring eventually. I will post some making-of photos on my twitter later.
Ender 3 printed the burger buns (Light Ivory PLA), and the limbs (Vertigo Grey PLA). Everything else was printed on the Prusa i3 MK3.
Fries & Cheese (Melon Yellow PLA), Lettuce (Grass Green PLA), Meat (Purple Red PLA), Shields (Traffic White PLA)

Did you have any issues with stringing on CPE? Because when it’s moist, it can be  hairy printing.
Moisture did not get any chance since that was a perfectly packaged brand new spool; and after printing, I put it right back to the reusable ziplock bag. :)

It’s not an easy design but definitely worth it. What did you need for assembling it?
For the burger, I have used hot glue gun. And I designed and printed a custom fitting ring for some of the parts. The legs and arms are just slide in. For the thrusters, I used a small strip of kapton tape to make some friction so they would not fall out.

With upscaling to this giant size there can be an issue with stability which isn’t there in the original size. We almost didn’t manage to make it stand. Do you think it’s something what can decrease the head part weight to reduce the pressure on the legs? Of course he is super-awesome while sitting too, but.. : )
Yeah, the upscaling generated some issues with the tolerances. His joints became a lil’ loose. I think the main issue are the knees. I would glue them to a fix position, or drill and use a screw and a nut through the knee joint. I was able to get him standing with fries box on his back. :) I have a proof.

What are your feelings from Fillamentum materials?
I really love just everything about Fillamentum. The box, reusable ziplock packaging for moisture defense, beautiful glass clear spool, and of course, filament itself. It comes in beautiful vivid colours and quality material. I’ve never had any problems related to the material. Oh, and the surprise stickers! :)
Thank you 💛

The world is divided into two parts…. Ketchup or mayo to your french fries?: )
Lol! Ketchup.

Any ambitions for next projects?
I really like multipart models where you can combine a lot of filaments together.
That is where nice colours and glittery materials can show their beauty and form awesome combinations together. So definitely I would print something big, multipart thing with perfect material combinations.
I recently started to paint some models but then you can just use any filament. :)

 

Laila for scale : )

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