Projects blog

3D printed Lamp series by UUP Design November 15 2019

Triin Kõivupuu & Andre Visnapuu are the founders of UUP Design, a design studio based in Estonia. Both of them studied at Pallas University of Applied Sciences, where they met. Soon they discovered that they share the same passion and ideas in design.



In the beginning, they brought their first 3D printer solely for prototyping purposes. However, as they discovered the capabilities of 3D printing, they soon fell in love with the final finish of the printed objects. Especially the Timebrfills natural finish fresh from the printer.

"At first, we didn't plan to build our series on 3D printing, but then we started to print with Timebrfill…" they explain.



When they started to print, PLA was their clear beginning choice because it is effortless to set up and print. Furthermore, the environmental aspect is also vital to Triin and Andre.

"By working with different materials, we are seeking special and economical solutions, designing future classics. We love what we do and hope it reflects in our products," said UPP Design.



PLA Extrafill and Timberfill are 100% bio-based and biodegradable materials. However, an industrial composting facility, where large piles are used, and aeration & moisture are appropriately controlled, is needed. Biodegradable plastics can be collected and composted through biowaste collection.

They created two collections, namely KUMA, the floor lamp & HÕÕG lighting series, with a ceiling lamp and a table lamp.



KUMA
Andre and Triin used PLA Extrafill that, when printed, exhibits pleasant texture. Ultimately the lamp gives out a cozy textilelike felling rather than the look of bleak plastic. White lampshade provides enough light for reading; it gives out a delightful mood light. The lamp is also made of elements such as textile cable, metal pipes, and metal socket, creating a charming ceiling lamp. It took about a year of testing and tweaking the product to finalize the design.



HÕÕG lighting series

UUP Design used Timberfill, which is a wood composite material with real wood fibers. The wood fibers display an authentic natural look and wood sensation. "Hõõg table lamp has a lightweight, and yet stable lamp rosette creating a lampshade which is 3D printed. Lampshades are minimal in design and inspired by the classic form," adds Andre. The dome design is created to conceal the light bulb, resulting in a clean appearance with mood hazy light.



"We couldn't be happier with this environmentally friendly material selection; all printed details are made with biodegradable plastic," Triin and UUP Design say in excitement. An important note is that this product has been designed, produced, and even packed in an environmentally friendly manner from the beginning to the end.



Printed with:

PLA Extrafill "Traffic White"
Timberfill "Light Wood Tone"
Timberfill "Cinnamon"

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3D Printed Violin by Bence Balogh November 08 2019

With a BSc degree in Mechatronics Engineering and a Master's degree in Economics, Bence Balogh found a new love for something unusual. As he participated in the Conference of Scientific Students' Associations in the subject of "Examination of 3D Printing Parameters on the products mechanical properties," he found an interesting topic by HovaLabs, an open-source project, the 3D printable acoustic violin.




"I used to learn how to play the piano and the classical guitar for many years, and I also tried playing the violin. Unfortunately, my violin career only lasted for about a month. I was fascinated by the grace of the violin, and I adore when someone is playing it professionally. It became a must to make one in order to test the connection between 3D printing and music," Ben explains.



"The original Hovalin was amazing, so I consulted with several musicians, especially prime violinists. They gave me useful tips about how to improve and develop the model. It became my obsession to create the violin as realistic as I could, based on the Hovalin and the recommendations by the professionals. I am really satisfied with the result so far. However, I am still working on details and collecting feedbacks for further improvements. The 3D printed violin is an instrument, ornament, and something spectacular," says Ben with excitement. 




In the beginning, Bence used basic PLA for the prototyping as it is the most common material that's also very easy to use. He had to make a few alternations regarding the bridge, as the strings were too strong and broke the original bridge made of PLA. He decided to use CPE for the neck and bridge because of the strain and holding capabilities. In the end, the body of the violin is constructed from PLA Crystal Clear "Smaragd Green", and the neck with the bridge is made from more rigid CPE HG100 "Iced Green Transparent". Full bodies took 40-50 hours to print on the Creality CR10S. Even with the lower resolution, it took 20-30 hours with few iterations. This project was very time-consuming. 




"Many of my friends who play the classical violin helped me, so I learned a lot about the soul, body, and the creation process of a violin. On the other hand, I deeply absorbed 3D printing, maintenance knowledge, 3D design, and remix skills. The most important was to have the patience for this project and the ability to learn from my mistakes. My main goal was to bring 3D printing, music, and people closer together and to challenge myself. Whenever I show the 3D printed violin to people, I see the pure joy and curiosity on their faces, and I think this is the real achievement," Ben tells us. With the help of Stella Nagy, he was able to take breathtaking pictures in The Palace of Music in Miskolc, Hungary.



Printed with:
Body: PLA Crystal "Clear Smaragd Green"
Neck, bridge: CPE HG100 "Iced Green Transparent"

Printed on: 
Creality CR10S

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Poly Disco Balls by Devin Montes October 11 2019

Devin Montes runs a YouTube channel and website called Make Anything with a belief that everybody should have access to well-designed products.

 

With the intent of building a single Polyhedra Disco Ball, Devin didn't hesitate to go big and printed around 1000 individual connecting parts called Polypanels. They come in any number of shapes, sizes, and forms, but the edge connectors are always the same so they are very compatible. Only two different models, the square and triangle panels, were used to make all these different shapes.

 

These Polyhedra panels are an example of the limitless possibilities that can be build just from a few simple building blocks. These particular panels were designed especially for holding pre-cut mirrors that were ordered online. PLA Vertigo Starlight was the perfect complement to the mirrors, giving that extra pop of contrast Devin was hoping for.

 

Download here:
Myminifactory

Printed with:
PLA Extrafill "Vertigo Starlight"

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Ragnaros Lamp Figure by 3Dmon October 04 2019

For several years the 3Dmon team has been working in the 3D printing and 3D modeling industry. They consist of passionate 3D printers and 3D modelers based in Prague. Fantasy and cosplay being their long-time hobby they created this cool Ragnaros Lamp Figure from World of Warcraft.

3D printed fan art figures are pretty fun, but if you want to step up your game, the combination of 3D printed parts and electronics like LED’s is your way to go. 3Demon created this figure, presenting unique challenges while being pretty simple and straight forward to make. For everyone who wants to make their collection just a bit more unique Ragnaros the Fire lord is a perfect pick.


You can either pick to print your own model or order a physical one.
Read more about this project on Instructables or watch a tutorial video.

Printed with:
PLA Crystal Clear
PLA Extrafill "Vertigo Galaxy"

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3D printed sole for sandals by Lucie Trejtnarová September 27 2019

Lucie Trejtnarová, a student of the Footwear design studio, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Czech Republic, has developed the Organic 3D printed shoe collection.

"Designers of the new generation are starting to think differently with the developing of new materials and using waste and natural resources to reuse what already exists. This fact inspired me for my project," explains Lucie. 

The experimental collection of shoes is the outcome of the Diploma thesis called Organic mentored by Ivana Kaňovská and Eva Klabalová. Trejtnarová researched recently introduced ecologically friendly materials developed by designers of a new generation. Her work aims to assess the suitability of these materials for the processes of footwear and accessories manufacturing.
At the heart of the work, there is a revolution material Malai - also known as coconut leather, which is fully compostable. This material is used in combination with ecological-friendly material Piňatex – a natural fabric made from pineapple leaves. To support natural fabrics, the designer wanted to find suitable materials for soles. Thanks to cooperation with Fillamentum company from a previous school project, Trejtnarová discovered Flexfill 98A and Flexfill 92A.

The experimental sandal line integrates 3D printed outsoles from TPU-based Flexfill 98A, which could be recyclable.

 


The entire process of work and research is backed up by her experience from an internship in India, the production place of this material. With these materials, Trejtnarová chose to create sandals to suit the warm and wet conditions of India.


Printed by:
Ondřej Puchta, Miloš Cettl, Lucie Trejtnarová, Fillamentum Ltd.

Design:
Lucie Trejtnarová

Printed with:
Flexfill TPU 98A "Powder Beige"

Printed on: 
Ultimaker S3, TRILAB DeltiQ 

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The "Visitors" Laser gun by Nacho3D September 19 2019

Let us introduce to you Nacho3D an engineer from Spain who brought this nostalgic movie prop project to life.

Late '80s American TV show ‘Visitors’ which was very popular at the time is about humans fighting aliens and this fight was an inspiration for the print. Every good fight needs a good gun. In this case, heroes were shooting with laser guns or laser sniper rifles. 

 

The design of a weapon was ready two years ago, but due to difficulties with supports Nacho3d brought it to life just this year and it is definitely worth it! 

 

Let's dive into some more technical details. The gun was designed with Catia V5, a popular CAD 3D software. Some parts were printed on Ultimaker 2+ with Cura 4.1.0 slicer. Apart from the connector, the gun was printed in PLA Traffic Black with 0,4 nozzle and 0,2 layer height with the recommended printing speed 30mm/s and 215°C nozzle temperature. For the connector was used PLA Crystal Clear and PLA Crystal Clear Iceland Blue. In the case of a connector Nacho3D strongly recommends 212°C and the nozzle, layer height and speed the same as the rest. It took approximately 21hours to print the whole gun.

 

We were wondering why did Nacho3D pick up this project. “I wanted to try to design a weapon and this laser gun appeared in an 80's series of my childhood, ‘V’ or the ‘Visitors’. It was a USA miniseries about an alien invasion that really was very popular in my country. The laser gun and the laser sniper rifle were the weapons of the aliens, but they were also used by the heroes of the series” he explains. Would you like to put your hands on this project as well? The model is available on Thingiverse or Cults3D.

Printed with:
PLA Crystal Clear
PLA Crystal Clear "Iceland Blue"

Download here:
Thingiverse
Cults3D

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Saturn V by Carcasaink September 06 2019

While most of the people are printing small gifts and vases, team Carcasaink gets far away from basic 3D printing. Take a look at a really amazing work on printing Saturn V, designed by Paul Fisher.

Hello, how is your day going?:)
My day is doing great as always, printing a lot of stuff, bringing to reality awesome ideas.

What do you have here?
The Saturn V rocket with gantry is our biggest print so far, we choose this challenge because we love the history behind this masterpiece of engineering and this model is very complex and difficult to get done, thousand of parts, small details, everything is just perfect to test our machines and settings.

Who made the model for this make?
You can find the complete model here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:911891 all the credits to its creator! (Mr. Paul Fischer, editor’s note)

What materials did you use? 
We used Fillamentum PLA in the whole print and a lot of crazy glue to join the pieces together.

Was it hard to finish? 
Was pretty hard to finish because not only the bunch of pieces that were printed (over 2000) but also because of the fine details and the time that took the big ones. Some pieces required almost 3 days to get done, some parts of the rocket (for example, the F1 engines) took a lot of hours of gluing and because they are small pieces, sometimes the assembling process was challenging. The rocket itself was easy to print and glue together but the gantry was pretty hard, not only because it has a lot of parts but also the precision is a must.

Why did you choose Fillamentum materials for this project?
Because of its reliability, vivid colors, easy to print and its price.

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Mechdonalds Printed by Grafit February 27 2019

He is from Hungary and we met on Twitter while he was using our materials for really nice and clean printing. “I am already helping Fernando with his top secret project, beta testing at 40% size”. We knew we are on the same page to make some good collaboration!

*Fernando Jerez is our long-time friend, he’s talented designer who started the wavey madness with his generative design.

Hello Grafit,
When I was asking you about some ideas for a new bigger project, you wanted to print exactly this amazing design by Juri Pranjic. How did you find the model?
I have seen this earlier on Twitter when Juri designed it and started printing his own. I became a follower of @3dworkbench instantly.

Two materials in seven different colours, tell us more about the printing process ... Which printer you used, how long did it take to print? Did you use any tricks or special set up for printing?
Well, the CPE Red Hood filament was a completely new material for me. And because it needed high temperature, I used my Prusa i3 MK3 for that job. No failures there. It came out nicely in the first round. On the pictures you can see, it is the tomato slice.
Since I scaled up this awesome model to 140% I had to use some tricks. For example, on the original model, every part of the burger is solid. However in a perfect world, you will never see the inside of the tomato slice, and the meat etc. so I decided to cut out most parts. The tomato slice is a ring eventually. I will post some making-of photos on my twitter later.
Ender 3 printed the burger buns (Light Ivory PLA), and the limbs (Vertigo Grey PLA). Everything else was printed on the Prusa i3 MK3.
Fries & Cheese (Melon Yellow PLA), Lettuce (Grass Green PLA), Meat (Purple Red PLA), Shields (Traffic White PLA)

Did you have any issues with stringing on CPE? Because when it’s moist, it can be  hairy printing.
Moisture did not get any chance since that was a perfectly packaged brand new spool; and after printing, I put it right back to the reusable ziplock bag. :)

It’s not an easy design but definitely worth it. What did you need for assembling it?
For the burger, I have used hot glue gun. And I designed and printed a custom fitting ring for some of the parts. The legs and arms are just slide in. For the thrusters, I used a small strip of kapton tape to make some friction so they would not fall out.

With upscaling to this giant size there can be an issue with stability which isn’t there in the original size. We almost didn’t manage to make it stand. Do you think it’s something what can decrease the head part weight to reduce the pressure on the legs? Of course he is super-awesome while sitting too, but.. : )
Yeah, the upscaling generated some issues with the tolerances. His joints became a lil’ loose. I think the main issue are the knees. I would glue them to a fix position, or drill and use a screw and a nut through the knee joint. I was able to get him standing with fries box on his back. :) I have a proof.

What are your feelings from Fillamentum materials?
I really love just everything about Fillamentum. The box, reusable ziplock packaging for moisture defense, beautiful glass clear spool, and of course, filament itself. It comes in beautiful vivid colours and quality material. I’ve never had any problems related to the material. Oh, and the surprise stickers! :)
Thank you 💛

The world is divided into two parts…. Ketchup or mayo to your french fries?: )
Lol! Ketchup.

Any ambitions for next projects?
I really like multipart models where you can combine a lot of filaments together.
That is where nice colours and glittery materials can show their beauty and form awesome combinations together. So definitely I would print something big, multipart thing with perfect material combinations.
I recently started to paint some models but then you can just use any filament. :)

 

Laila for scale : )

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Cults:

 Recipe (material list):

 

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